Sunday April 28 is World Day for Safety and Health at Work which is an initiative of the International Labour Organisations (ILO). It was established to encourage remembrance and reflection on those who have lost their lives or been injured at work.

New Zealand sees 600-900 work-related deaths per year from health exposures, and in 2018 42 people died from work-related incidents.

The President of the New Zealand Institute of Safety Management (NZISM) Greg Dearsly has said that this day is another opportunity to put the spotlight on the true extent of work related health and safety incidents in New Zealand.

“Our current statistics do not represent the total problem,” he says. “While all countries report in the same way we should be looking at the wider problem and tackle three areas: workplace safety to protect workers from accidents, workplace health to address long term risks and issues and work related driver safety. Accidents at work grab headlines and sadly our statistics are still high compared to other OECD countries, so we need to continue our strong efforts to reduce them.”

He has also said that we need to put more attention on work health issues. If driving is part of any worker’s role, it should the responsibility of the employer to help them be a safer driver.

As the International Labour Organization (ILO) marks its 100th anniversary, the World Day for Safety and Health at Work 2019 takes stock of the past hundred years’ efforts to improve occupational safety and health and looks at how changes in the world of work will affect occupational safety and health in the future. View their video below.